Transport Layer | Layer 4 | The OSI-Model

OSI Layer 4 – Transport Layer

In computer networking, the transport layer is a conceptual division of methods in the layered architecture of protocols in the network stack in the Internet Protocol Suite and the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI). The protocols of the layer provide host-to-host communication services for applications.[1] It provides services such as connection-oriented data stream support, reliability, flow control, and multiplexing.

The details of implementation and semantics of the Transport Layer of the TCP/IP model (RFC 1122), which is the foundation of the Internet, and the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model of general networking, are different. In the OSI model the transport layer is most often referred to as Layer 4 or L4, while numbered layers are not used in TCP/IP.

The best-known transport protocol of TCP/IP is the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), and lent its name to the title of the entire suite. It is used for connection-oriented transmissions, whereas the connectionless User Datagram Protocol (UDP) is used for simpler messaging transmissions. TCP is the more complex protocol, due to its stateful design incorporating reliable transmission and data stream services. Other prominent protocols in this group are the Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP) and the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP).

Wikipedia

Services

• Connection-oriented communication

• Same order delivery

• Reliability

• Flow control

• Congestion avoidance

• Port Multiplexing

Popular Transport Layer Protocols

ATP

AppleTalk Transaction Protocol

CUDP

Cyclic UDP

DCCP

Datagram Congestion Control Protocol

FCP

Datagram Congestion Control Protocol

IL

Fibre Channel Protocol

MPTCP

IL Protocol

RDP

Multipath TCP

RUDP

Reliable User Datagram Protocol

SCTP

Stream Control Transmission Protocol

SPX

Sequenced Packet Exchange

SST

Structured Stream Transport

TCP

Transmission Control Protocol

UDP

User Datagram Protocol

UDP-Lite

User Datagram Protocol

µTP

Micro Transport Protocol

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s